The Dabney

The Dabney, which is located on the historic 9th Street in Blagden Alley, takes inspiration from Langhorne’s own family lineage, which dates back to over a century in the Shenandoah Valley. The chef envisioned a menu and space that was reminiscent of the 19th century, tying in both the flavor and style of the D.C. area.

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Hospitality Construction Services Collaborated With Brian Miller From Edit Lab at Streetsense to Bring The Dabney to Life

Congratulations To Our Friends & Clients Jeremiah Langhorne & Alex Zink!

Chef and restaurateur Jeremiah Langhorne teamed up with restaurant general contractor Hospitality Construction Services and architecture firm Edit Lab at Streetsense to design his debut restaurant, which pays homage to Mid-Atlantic cuisine and reinvents D.C.’s culinary identity.

The Dabney, which is located on the historic 9th Street in Blagden Alley, takes inspiration from Langhorne’s own family lineage, which dates back to over a century in the Shenandoah Valley. The chef envisioned a menu and space that was reminiscent of the 19th century, tying in both the flavor and style of the D.C. area.

Using a photograph of the alley from the 1900s, Hospitality Construction Services, in collaboration with Edit Lab, was able to replicate the exterior, which was once used as a stable and carriage house. Inspiration was also taken from historic buildings found around Baltimore. Reclaimed and antique materials were sourced from the Maryland area, giving the project a local feel.

No detail was overlooked at The Dabney. Brick walls and wood floors give the space a rustic feel. Spindle back chairs complement custom tables, built by a craftsman in Baltimore. Classic colors and finishes are used throughout – and include whites, brass fixtures and antique glass. A stunning old farm table was retrofitted for the space to create the chef’s stand. Antique, victorian roofing shingles adorn the bar, which were descaled and refinished to remove old rust. The Dabney also features open joists, beadboard ceilings, wainscot, and special plaster, which adorns the walls, that the team at Hospitality Construction Services handmade themselves. In addition to the flooring, reclaimed wood is used throughout the restaurant, including the millwork and as open shelving that holds dishes and is used for additional storage.

Staying true to the rustic theme, the menu centers around the corner stone of the restaurant, a custom built hearth that is ten feet wide by five feet tall. Although the restaurant has a fully functioning kitchen, most of the food will be cooked campfire-style using the log-burning hearth and cast-iron pots.

GALLERY

INFO

michelin star restaurant

A MICHELIN STAR RESTAURANT

ADDRESS

22 Blagden Alley
Washington, DC 20001

OWNED BY

Jeremiah Langhorne & Alex Zink

ARCHITECT

Edit Lab at Streetsense

SQUARE FEET

4000 sq/ft

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